TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES

By:  John Holmgren         TheExpertResumeWriter.com

In this current uncertain economy, many employers are not willing, and are even afraid, to hire a permanent worker.  It doesn’t seem that will change any time soon.

The situation is that you need a job now.  What do you do, and where do you go?

The immediate answer is:  go to the temporary employment agencies.

You instantly reply that you don’t want day work.

Temp agencies typically have clients that need workers for a period of time from a few weeks to several months.  Due to budget issues, many jobs last as “temp” for years.

The reason an employer needs a temp employee varies widely.  Among them are vacations, specific projects, sickness, peak load work, and so forth.  But it is a real need.

Going to a temp employment agency is the path of easiest resistance for you.  It is just easier to find an organization that will put you to work on a temp basis.

True, you do not have a long term, assured future with the organization.  However, it is also true that temp employment gives you the chance to learn if you want to be employed by the organization.  They may not be your long term choice.

It is also true that you do not have a long term, assured future with any organization.

There are other obvious advantages to temp employment:

  • It is easier to get a job if you have a job
  • You feel better about yourself if you have income (and can pay your bills)
  • Many temp jobs become permanent employment
  • You multiply your exposure to employers

Do your homework.  Here in Charleston, SC, not a large city, I located without difficulty 20 temporary employment agencies.  There are certainly more.  They should ALL know of you and the skills you have to help an organization achieve its goals!

Obviously, the telephone book Yellow Pages will get you started in locating these agencies.  Additionally, your local library can give you enormous assistance with that and many other issues.  They are trained to provide exactly that help.  Talk to them.

More about that in a later blog.  Cheers, John